Category Archives: Wedding

Sew A Passport Cover (With A Pocket)

The wedding countdown continues! Today, it’s not so much of a wedding craft per-se, but a honeymoon craft. I just got my first ever, brand new, shiny passport. I know it’ll accompany me on many fun journeys with my new hubby, and I wanted to protect its blemish-free cover. So I designed this little tutorial to help you sew a passport cover (with a pocket– because all things need pockets!)

Sew A Passport Cover

All you’ll need is some scraps of fabric, a sewing machine and less than a half hour of your time.

Cut a rectangle of your outside fabric (mine is blue with little anchors) 10 inches by 6 inches, and then cut a rectangle of your lining fabric (white cotton in my case) the same size.  If you want a pocket, cut two rectangles of either fabric (I went with my lining fabric) 4 1/2 inches by 3 1/2 inches.  Press all of your fabric to remove any wrinkles or creases.
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Place the fabrics right sides together and use a 1/4 inch seam allowance to sew around 3 sides and part of the fourth for both rectangles (I’m better at showing than explaining, so you can see in the pictures below how I started along the bottom edge, sewed around three sides, and then went a little bit on the bottom edge again.  Clip your corners so you can turn it inside out easily.
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Turn both pieces inside out and press flat.

Using a needle and coordinating thread, sew up the opening using a whip stitch (or whatever blind stitch you are good at) on both the cover and the pocket.

Lay your cover flat, right side up, and place the pocket on the left side of the fabric, about an 1 1/4 inches in from the left side.  Pin into place and sew around the left side, bottom and right side (leaving the top open).

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Turn the cover upside down, and fold in about 1 inch on each side. (You might want to lay your passport on the fabric to measure.  If you didn’t use a 1/4 inch seam allowance, or other differences in sewing may make this measurement different– always double check to be sure!)

Now, you can either use your sewing machine to sew along the very very edge of these flaps (at the top and bottom) or hand sew them using a whip stitch again.  I picked hand-sewing to make for a more polished finish.
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Slide your passport into its new cover and marvel in your handy-ness (and dream of exotic vacations to come!)
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DIY Satin Flower Accents {Tutorial}

I’ve got a quick and easy DIY tutorial today!
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These little satin flower accents are super easy to make and can be used for a variety of things– accents on purses or clothes, turned into a necklace or even sewn onto a baby or child’s headband!

I made these as accents for my bridesmaid’s dresses and purses.  My bridesmaid’s are all wearing navy blue dresses that we bought from Nordstrom.  A similar dress can be found here (although, now it’s in teal, and it’s not carried in navy any more).  It’s a very simple one shoulder sheath dress with an allover lace overlay.  It also comes with a simple satin tie for the waist.  Our wedding colors are navy and coral, so this dress was perfect, but it needed a pop of color, so I made these flowers to add to the satin tie.

You’ll need very little to make this project:
-Scraps of satin fabric
-a piece of paper (to make a pattern)
-large beads or pearls
-hand sewing needle and thread
-scissors
-a candle
-matches or a lighter
-bowl of water (juuuuust in case you should happen to catch something on fire!)
-tongs
-a fire proof area to work in

*Note* – This is a very easy project, but obviously is not one for children.  You will be working around fire.  Please exercise caution and work in an area/on a fireproof surface, have a bowl of water ready, tie your hair back, roll up your sleeves, etc.
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Step 1: After assembling your supplies and taking the necessary safety precautions (I can’t stress this enough!), cut out your pattern pieces. I used a piece of scrap paper and cut out three wonky circles (they are purposefully not perfect because I didn’t want my flowers to be perfect little circles, but obviously if you want them to be perfect you could use a compass or trace some circular items you have lying around). I wanted my flowers to be three layers so I made three pattern pieces, all circles, and measuring 2 inches across, 1.5 inches across and a hair over 1 inch across. You can altar these sizes to fit your needs.
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Step 2: Cut out the fabric.  Using your pattern pieces as a guide, cut out your fabric.  Here you can see I needed four sets of each of my three colors- I have an array of little fabric circles!
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Step 3: The dangerous step!  Make sure your bowl of water is nearby and any long hair is tied back.  Carefully light your candle, and using your tongs, hold the edge of the circle over the flame.  This will lightly singe and seal the edge.  If you hit it at the right angle and from the bottom, it will also curl up slightly which will make for a nice effect on the finished flower.  *Tip*- cut out a few extra circles to practice on.  Once you get your technique down, go for the good pieces.
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Step 4- After all of your flower edges have been sealed, stack up the three pieces, largest on the bottom to smallest on the stop, and using your needle and thread, sew a few stitches through the center. I used a pearl as a center accent, but you could use a large bead or even a button.
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Step 5- bask in the glory of all your little satin flowers!
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I haven’t attached them to the bridesmaid dresses yet, but I did make some smaller ones and attach them to the bridesmaid clutches (which I wrote more about here.)
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If you make them, please let me know in the comments what you decide to add them to! I think they would be darling attached to a little headband for babies or children (perfect photo op for all you photographers out there!).

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Extra Wedding Invitations? Invite These Celebrities to Get Signed Memorabilia!

Yesterday, I wrote about our Wedding Invitations, and I mentioned that yes, we did sent an invitation to Mickey and Minnie Mouse.

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Word on the street is that if you invite Mickey and Minnie to your wedding, they will politely decline, but will send you an autographed photo of them standing in front of the Castle. I’ve also read that they could send you a postcard and perhaps a “just married” button. We had a few extra invitations, so I figured I’d give it a try! If anything, it’ll make for a nice addition to our wedding scrapbook.
It also got me thinking, who else could we invite with the hopes of getting some signed/autographed memorabilia to add to the scrapbook? I did some research, and came up with this list.

Readers have noted that it doesn’t just have to be for your wedding – you can try requesting responses using birth announcements, birthday party invitations, graduation announcements and more!

*Note- sending invitations to the following people does not guarantee you’ll get a response in any form, but it’s still fun to try! If you do get a response, let me know in the comment section above! I’d love to hear your story!

List of Celebrities to invite to your wedding:
(Yes- I did send two sets to Mickey and Minnie– one to Disneyland and one to Walt Disney World. I heard that Disneyland was better at responding, and I want my odds to be in my favor!)

Mickey and Minnie Mouse
The Walt Disney Company
500 South Buena Vista Street
Burbank, CA 91521

Mickey and Minnie Mouse
The Magic Kingdom
1675 N Buena Vista Drive
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830

Honorable Barack Obama and Mrs. Obama
The White House
Greetings Office Rm. 39
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20500
(Apparently he’s very good about sending you a congratulatory letter)

Cinderella and Prince Charming
P.O. Box 1000
Lake Buena Vista, Florida 32830
(I hear they send you a certificate)

Madonna
Untitled Entertainment
1801 Century Park E.
Suite 700
Los Angeles, CA 90067

Ellen Degeneres
ATTN: Fan Mail
PO Box 7788
Burbank, CA 91522
(Hey- you never know, you could end up on her show!)

Oprah Winfrey
Harpo Productions
PO Box 909715
Chicago, IL 60690
(I heard she sends you a car. A free car. Free cars for everyone! Haha– just kidding. I wish!)

Darius Rucker
Essential Broadcast Media, LLC
21 Music Sq W
Nashville, TN 37203
(Our first dance will be danced to his song “History In the Making”. I’m thinking about adding a little note about that in the invite)

I also discovered this website:
http://www.fanmail.biz/

It is an online database of many celebrities and their addresses. If I haven’t listed someone, perhaps you can find them on that site!

I’ll be sure to update this post if and when I receive any responses! Let me know in the comments if you have had any success with the addresses listed.

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Wedding Invitations

A big ole check for our wedding checklist– our wedding invitations went out this weekend! I am DIY-ing as much as our wedding as I can, not only to save a little money, but because it’s in my blood! People who know me know that I have to have my personal touch on everything that goes into our wedding. So far, I’ve blogged about the handmade bridesmaids clutches I made, the chalkboard trays we’re going to use to write the buffet menu on, and the ‘Sweating For the Wedding” t-shirts I made for my sister and myself.
But– nothing has taken up more time than these invitations! I had no idea that such a simple task would be so time consuming.
For those that don’t know our background, a quick rundown- my fiancé is in the Air Force and is stationed on the opposite end of the country, so unfortunately, he hasn’t had much of a hand in planning the wedding. However, he was visiting me a few months ago, and I sat him down to help with the wedding favors and invitations. Making the invitations themselves took almost an entire day! Before we even got to the designing step, we had to think of the wording, proof read it (at least 5 times!), and then I designed the layout in Photoshop, and finally we printed them. We had to feed the paper into the printer only a few at a time to prevent jamming. Then, they all had to be slid into their little vellum sleeve, which was not an easy task (but he was a trooper and helped out!).
Afterward, we had to plan out the response cards. I wanted to go with something fun, he did not. So we compromised and made two different kinds. More on that below.
Onto the pictures for now- here’s an overview of the whole shebang.
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Aren’t these envelopes gorgeous?  My mom hand-calligraphied (Is that a word?) all 100+ envelopes. She has always done calligraphy, but a few months ago, she and I took a class in copperplate, which is a fancier, more scroll-ish version of calligraphy.  She estimates that the envelopes alone took her nearly 30 hours to complete.

(And yes, we did invite Mickey and Minnie Mouse to our wedding  – more about that here. Click the link to find a whole list of celebrities you can invite to your wedding in hopes of getting back some autographed pictures or signed congratulatory letters!)
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Our invites– it features a small ribbon at the top and then it slides into the little vellum sleeve.  It took me forever to pick that font that I used too (I’m a font snob!).  I ended up using “Jenna Sue” – it’s a free download on a number of sites.
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My favorite part- our RSVP cards!  The one in the back is the plain one that we sent to some people, and the one in the front is the “fun” one that went mainly to our friends and anyone else we felt had a good sense of humor.  It is mad-libs style and I cannot wait to see what people fill in!

If you can’t read it, this is what it says: (the words in parenthesis are what they are supposed to fill in)

On July 28th, when Dana and Michael (verb) down the aisle, (your names) (will/will not) be there to (verb) them.  We were so (adjective) to receive the invite!  We promise to dance if you play (your favorite song).  We are (adjective) for them and wish them many years of happiness and (nouns).
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And last, a picture of everything lined up.  The card in the bottom right hand corner is just a postcard I ordered from Staples.  The front lists the address and phone number of the two hotels we blocked out rooms for the guests to stay at and has a map on the back for out of town guests.

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So there’s everything!  Between designing, printing, stuffing, attaching ribbons, writing addreses, stamping, licking (the envelopes), etc, I’m guessing we put in close to 50 hours.  Now I see why people just go out and order them!  Whew!  I told myself I deserve a big bowl of ice cream to take away the envelope taste so my only question now is…. vanilla or chocolate?

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Handmade Bridesmaids Clutches

In a quest to DIY as much as my wedding as possible, I made my bridesmaids not-quite-matching clutches.  I knew I wanted part of their bridesmaid gift to be a clutch filled with “wedding day essentials”, so I started to look around for some ideas.  The problem is, I found too many ideas!  I decided that I have 3 different bridesmaids, so I should have 3 different clutches (plus, one for myself!).  Here’s all four clutches (in our wedding colors- navy and coral)

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I had so much fun filling them with items I think they’d need on the big day! I got nail files, Tic Tac mints, hand cream, small mirror, a comb, some clear band aids, Chapstick, some bobby pins that I attached to a piece of card stock, and my favorite part– little hand sanitizers from Bath and Body Works that have a diamond ring on them and say “I love bling!”.  How perfect are they for a wedding?

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Each clutch measures 9in x 5in and have a small strap to hang from their wrist. They are all made out of satin which was strengthened with fusible interfacing.  They are all lined with a silk cotton lining.  Below, I have a picture of each clutch and a link to where I found the tutorial on how to make it.  Note* I did not follow the directions for each tutorial exactly– I modified them to fit my needs, but the basic directions are there.

I used this blog for the instructions on how to make the Bow Clutch.

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For this clutch, I just made it up as I went along, but it was based loosely on the clutch featured here — the top is a single band, the middle has four little pleats in it, and the bottom is a single band.  The flowers were made by me, and a tutorial on how to make them can be found here.  The same flowers will also be adorning the bridesmaids dresses.

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This clutch I made up as I went along– It is just a basic rectangle with a little ruffle sewn on.  I made the ruffle by making a tube out of the fabric,  basting a running stitch down the middle, gathering it, and then sewing it down onto the front piece of the clutch before sewing everything together.

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For this clutch, I used the tutorial found here. That blog also had a fabulous tutorial on how to insert the zipper. I used her tutorial for that on all four clutches, and let me say that they came out so professional looking!

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Can you think of anything else I should include in the clutches?

Linked up to:

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How to Use Freezer Paper as a Stencil (Tutorial)

Recently, my sister and I ran a 5k for Hurricane Sandy relief. It was my sisters first 5k, and I wanted to commemorate it by making us matching t-shirts. I debated using iron-on letters, but that seemed tacky, and I thought about using puffy pant to draw on the shirt, but that seemed cheap looking, then I remembered learning how to use freezer paper as a quilting stencil years ago, and thought it could be applied here.

Freezer paper, believe it or not, has some sort of coating on one side that makes it iron-able (meaning, if you iron it, it will stick to fabric).  This technique has been used by quilters who cut out shapes from the paper, iron it to the fabric, and then cut out their fabric.

To make this project you’ll need the following:
-A surface to stencil (in this case, a T-shirt)
-freezer paper
-a method to cut your stencil (I used a Cricut Expression Electronic Cutting Machine, but you could use scissors or an x-acto knife)
-iron
-newspaper
-fabric paint
-brush

In this case, I used my Cricut machine to cut out the words (although, you could use a fine pair of scissors or an x-acto knife to cut out your design!).  For the sake of our 5k (and our quest to lose weight for my upcoming wedding) I decided that we were “sweating for the wedding”, and cut those words out.

I then centered the paper on my shirt (glossy side down), and began to gently pressed it with a iron set to medium-high heat and no steam.  I was ironing onto a t-shirt, so please set your iron according to your fabric content.
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Iron away!  Make sure you apply firm, even pressure and that every square inch is firmly pressed down, especially around corners and small cutout pieces.  Make sure you are pressing and not ironing (pressing means you are lifting up the iron and pushing down for a few seconds, and ironing is the “sweeping” motion across the fabric.  If you iron, you may nick a piece of the freezer paper and tear it).

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After you are done ironing, and the fabric has cooled to the touch, place a few pieces of newspaper inside your shirt. This will ensure that paint does not seep through to the back. Then, use a small brush to apply fabric paint over the stencil.  To ensure you cover everything, I brush all the letters in a horizontal motion, and then go back in a vertical motion.

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Keep painting!

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Let the shirts dry for a bit.  Since the paint was brushed on, it shouldn’t be too thick, and therefore it shouldn’t take too long to dry.  Once they are dry to the touch, begin peeling the stencil off.  The stencil cannot be re-ironed, so don’t worry if you rip or tear it.

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Here’s our finished product!  (I suppose I should note here that it was a St. Patrick’s Day theme– everyone was asked to dress up in holiday spirit!)

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As a last minute addition, I added “maid of honor” and “bride” to the back of our shirts.  We were such a hit at the 5k! People were running past us (yeah… we’re slow!) yelling congratulations and telling us they loved our shirts.  We were even featured in the local newspaper because the journalist loved the shirt.

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And just for fun… 35 minutes in, we crossed the finish line! (Although, barely, for my sister, on the right)

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*Please note that this post contains affiliate links for Amazon. I receive a small percentage of compensation if you purchase any items by clicking through my link.

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Make a Chalkboard from a Tray

Lately, most of my crafts have been for my upcoming wedding.  One thing I wanted to do was to take some trays and paint them with chalkboard paint.  At the reception, these trays would serve various purposes; listing our “specialty drink” at the bar, having a menu at the beginning of the dinner buffet, and letting our guests know of a hashtag I’m going to ask them to use if they Instagram anything from our wedding.

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First, gather your supplies– Originally, I wanted to do this with a thrifted tray, but I couldn’t find any in my price range (nor did I want to ruin an antique!), but surprisingly, I picked up these at the dollar store.  Yes! The dollar store! (Dollar Tree to be exact– I’m pretty sure they’re across the country).  I was told this is something that they stock regularly, and they came in a variety of sizes.

You’ll need:
-A tray (or two… or three!)
-fine sandpaper
-blue painters tape
-primer (I went with Krylon )
-chalkboard paint (again- Krylon )
-newspaper

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The first thing you’re going to want to do is use the blue painters tape to mask off the edges of the tray (or whatever parts you don’t want to get chalkboard paint on).  If you want the entire tray to be covered in chalkboard paint, then skip this step!

Next, (not pictured), take your sandpaper and lightly sand the area to be painted.  This roughs up the surface so that the paint will adhere better.

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After your tray is prepped, find yourself a ventilated area and lay out some newspapers to catch the overspray.  Take my word on this– lay out way more newspaper than you think you’ll need, the overspray can really travel!

Start with one coat of the primer.  Follow the primer’s directions as to how long to let it dry. Each primer may have its own specific instructions.

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After your primer has dried according to the directions, apply at least two coats of chalkboard paint.  Once again, follow the instructions as to how long to wait between coats.

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Once the paint has dried thoroughly, “prime” your board according to the directions.  Most chalkboard paint brands suggest wiping chalk across the entire surface and wiping it clean before use.   After that, a soft cloth with a little bit of water will suffice for cleaning your chalkboard.

I have to admit, I’m having fun writing little sayings and quotes on these trays and using them for decoration!  I can also see using them as a prop in a photo shoot, or as a little make-shift to do list hung in my kitchen.

What would you use your tray for?

*Please note that this post contains affiliate links. If you purchase the items on Amazon through my links I receive a small percentage as a compensation.

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